Category: Invasive Species

Climate Change Will Mean Mass Movement of Wildlife — How Scientists Say We Can Prepare

When polar bears began showing up in Russian Siberia this year, experts suggested climate change may be a cause. Higher temperatures were melting ice in the Arctic, which polar bears rely on to hunt. The hungry bears had… Read More

Crapemyrtles: A Landscape Showstopper

Crapemyrtles are a beauty to behold in any landscape. They are popular landscape plants in Florida because of their ease of propagation, lengthy blooming period, ability to grow under a range of soil conditions, and are relatively inexpensive…. Read More

UF/IFAS Extension Nature Coast Master Gardeners Project Receives International Recognition

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Florida’s climate supports the growth of all varieties of plants, from native to exotic species. But University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences experts have long worked to educate the public on identifying… Read More

Silent Invader: Mexican Petunia, Ruellia simplex

Love and Hate Facebook gardening groups will light up at the mention of Mexican Petunia, Ruellia simplex.  Comments like “Worst weed ever!”, “My favorite plant!”, “Invasive! Pull it out quickly!”, and “It’s so easy to grow, I love… Read More

Silent Invader: Lantana

Silent Invaders When we think of things as being invasive we often imagine something like water Hyacinths covering every inch of a waterway or acres of Brazilian Peppers blocking out the sun where nothing else will grow. Invasive… Read More

Stormwater Ponds May Harbor Invasive Plants, UF/IFAS Research Finds

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Stormwater ponds are prevalent throughout Florida’s urban and residential landscapes, but University of Florida researchers are looking into whether these engineered ecosystems support the spread of invasive plant species. An ongoing UF Institute of Food… Read More

Battling Invasive Plants Good Investment, but More Funding Needed, Study Finds

For decades, Florida communities have battled invasive plants on land and water. These plants disrupt native ecosystems and livelihoods, and more arrive each year. Now a new study from the University of Florida and The Nature Conservancy shows… Read More

Agamas “Rainbow Lizards” on the Treasure Coast: A Florida Master Naturalist Final Project

For their Florida Master Naturalist Uplands course final project, Marko Sillanpaa and Chloe Lloyd conducted observational research on Agama agama on the Florida Treasure Coast.  I served as overall course instructor and Ellen Butler served as their final project… Read More

DNA Evidence Shows Burmese Pythons Infiltrating Everglades Bird Colonies

Scientists with the University of Florida and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) have found that Burmese pythons are occupying bird nesting areas in the Everglades, suggesting that pythons are attracted to wading birds where they breed. These findings… Read More