Low-Maintenance Landscaping: Vines

Low-Maintenance Vines

Vines are so versatile! Vines can be trained to grow on walls, fences, trellises, archways, and even trees. Keep reading to learn about some vines that require minimal watering and care in Sarasota County.

Note: The following information is adapted from the Florida-Friendly Landscaping Plant Guide.

Legend

Apart from the information presented in the table, the following features will be highlighted under each plant’s picture.

Light

Full sun: At least 6 hours of full sun

Part sun: 2-4 hours of full sun per day

Full shade: Full shade

Perks

Pollinator-friendly: Attracts pollinators

Attracts birds: Attracts birds

Edible: Edible parts*

Geography

Native: Native

Non-native: Non-native

 

Vines

Purple passionflower (Passiflora incarnata)

Maypop passion vine
Credit: UF/IFAS Gardening Solutions

Full sun Pollinator-friendly Attracts birds Native Edible

Height 5 to 10 feet
Growth Rate Fast
Hardiness 7A to 11
Light Requirement Full sun
Salt Tolerance Medium
Drought Tolerance High
Soil Preference Tolerates wide range of soil pH (4.5-8.0); medium-drained
Comments
  • Host plant to the zebra longwing and gulf fritillary butterflies
  • Attracts birds

Read more here.

Crossvine (Bignonia capreolata)

Trumpet flower
Credit: Florida-Friendly Landscaping Program™

Full sun Part sunFull shade Pollinator-friendly Attracts birds Native

Height 1 to 50 feet
Growth Rate Fast
Hardiness 6A to 9B
Light Requirement Full sun to full shade
Salt Tolerance Medium
Drought Tolerance High
Soil Preference Acidic to slightly alkaline (4.5-7.2), medium to well-drained
Comments
  • Attracts hummingbirds and pollinators

Read more here.

Bougainvillea (Bougainvillea spp.)

Bougainvillea
Credit: Dan Culbert, UF/IFAS

Full sun Part sunEdible Non-native

Height 0.5 to 0.75 feet
Growth Rate Fast
Hardiness 9B to 10B
Light Requirement Full to partial sun
Salt Tolerance Medium
Drought Tolerance High
Soil Preference Acidic to slightly alkaline (4.5-7.2), sandy loam, well-drained
Comments
  • Can be shaped into a shrub
  • The pink “flowers” are actually modified leaves
  • “Flowers” are edible and can be used in tea
  • Thorns should be avoided when pruning

Read more here.

Trumpet creeper (Campsis radicans)

Trumpet flower growing on fence
Credit: Florida-Friendly Landscaping Program™

Full sun Part sunFull shade Pollinator-friendly Attracts birds Native

Height 1 to 40 feet
Growth Rate Fast
Hardiness 4A to 10B
Light Requirement Full sun to full shade
Salt Tolerance Low
Drought Tolerance Medium
Soil Preference Tolerates wide range of soil pH (4.5-8.0); medium-drained
Comments
  • Attracts hummingbirds and pollinators
  • May irritate skin when handled

Read more here.

Coral honeysuckle (Lonicera sempervirens)

coral_honeysuckle
Credit: UF/IFAS

Full sun Part sunFull shade Pollinator-friendly Attracts birds Native

Height 1 to 15 feet
Growth Rate Fast
Hardiness 4 to 10
Light Requirement Full sun to full shade
Salt Tolerance Low
Drought Tolerance Medium
Soil Preference Slightly alkaline; clay; acidic; loam
Comments
  • Attracts hummingbirds and pollinators

Read more here.

If you want to learn about other low-maintenance plants for your landscape, read the rest of our Low-Maintenance Landscaping blog series.

*Although we discuss edibility in this blog, UF/IFAS Extension Sarasota County is not responsible for any illness or injury associated with foraging. Be aware that some plants may have been treated with pesticides and are not fit for human consumption. Always exercise caution.

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Forest Hecker, Florida-Friendly Landscaping™ Community Educator for Sarasota County's UF/IFAS Extension and Sustainability Department.Ashley Ellis, Residential Horticulture Agent and Master Gardener Volunteer Coordinator in Sarasota County.
Posted: April 2, 2024


Category: Conservation, Florida-Friendly Landscaping, Home Landscapes, UF/IFAS Extension, Water
Tags: Edible, Florida-Friendly Landscaping, Landscaping, Low, Maintenance, Native, Pgm_Water, Pollinators, Use, Water


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