North Florida Peanut Diagnostic Survey

After experiencing yield loss and financial setbacks during the 2017 growing season because of the “Peanut Collapse” phenomenon, a diagnostic survey project was established. Time was spent collecting samples during the 2018 peanut season to develop this useful regional tool. This project has immediate application for growers, and long-term benefits as well.

How does the survey work?

Producers can identify field locations with plants showing unknown disease symptoms or other signs of plant stress. Next, contact the local agriculture extension agent to help gather samples and have them submitted to the appropriate lab. A report with an analysis of the plant sample will be sent back to both the extension agent and producer. Additionally, the extension agent will need to know planting date, irrigation information, soil type, variety and a few other important details. The information obtained by the survey team along with the sample results will be entered into a platform to organize and archive the information for future use.

What is the purpose of the survey?

The purpose of the survey is to help make connections between environmental factors relating to plant stress. Overtime, this project will serve as an early warning system for the occurrence of disease or  stress impacting the health of the crop. Once the data is condensed, participants and extension agents on the team will then use the information to help predict and find solutions for serious disasters like Peanut Collapse of 2017.

How does the survey benefit growers?
  • Samples can be sent off for analysis free of charge to the producer for reports on the following: nematode counts, disease diagnostics, insect identification,  foliar nutrient analysis, soil analysis.
  • The project has the potential to help producers overcome future challenges related to disease pressure and plant stress associated with climate and environmental changes on a long-term basis.
  • The grower can choose a field location with a known history of problems for monitoring throughout the season, or he/she may use the resource on an as-needed basis as issues arise.

Contact De Broughton, deonne@ufl.edu or your county agriculture extension agent for more details.

UF/IFAS Extension is an Equal Opportunity Institution

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