Pineapple pear blossom

Fact sheet: Pineapple Pear

 

Pineapple Pear
Pyrus communis ‘
Pineapple

This is the old-fashioned pear your Grandmother raised. Tough, hardy and hard to kill. Produces bushels of hard cooking pears. Ripens July-August. Pollinate with Courthouse, Flordahome, Baldwin, Golden Boy, Hood or Le Conte.

Cultivar: Pineapple
Family: Rosaceae
Size: to 25 feet
Spread: 15 to 20 feet
Characteristics: High Maintenance
Blooms: Early to Late Spring
Hardiness: Zones 5-9
Light: Full sun

Best grown in well-drained humusy loams with medium moisture in full sun. More tolerant of heavy clays that many other types of fruit tree.A slightly acid soil suits pears best and a very alkaline soil should be avoided as, in such conditions, pears suffer badly from iron deficiency. Plant two or more varieties for best cross-pollination. Early spring flowers may be damaged by frosts. Planting early, midseason and late varieties extends the harvest period over several months. Trees may not bear fruit until 4-5 years after planting. Very susceptible to fireblight, particularly in years with warm and wet spring weather. Additional disease problems include anthracnose, canker, scab and powdery mildew. Insect visitors include pear psylla, coddling moth and borers.

Pest/Disease Management Issues/Pears
Disease problems include anthracnose, canker, scab and powdery mildew. Insect visitors include pear psylla, coddling moth and borers Fire blight (Erwinia amylovera). Light pruning, pruning of dead limbs and frequent removal of leaf and limb debris should occur on a regular basis.

Planted in Nassau County Extension Demonstration Garden