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Sliced avocado on a cutting board

Holy Guacamole, It’s Almost Avocado Season!

A full-form avocado tree growing in the ground. Avocado trees are a popular choice in south Florida landscapes, and even farther north. When I first moved to Gainesville, my roommate had two trees, though the potted one disappeared one night, thus proving their popularity.

Avocados are a highly nutritious fruit, rich in healthy fats, fiber, and potassium. But more importantly, they’re delicious, with a creamy texture and a cool flavor that complements a wide variety of foods. Yes, that includes toast.

For an avocado, maybe it is easy being green…

It’s easy enough to go to the store or farmers’ market for your avocados, and in season, they can be had cheaply. But part of what makes the tree so popular for landscapes is that it’s relatively easy to take care of. Additionally, once it starts bearing, the fruit does not ripen until after you pick it, meaning you can eat at your own pace.

AskIFAS has a wide variety of articles on planting, caring for, and harvesting your avocado trees. The best place to start is Avocado Growing in the Florida Home Landscape by Jonathan H. Crane, Carlos F. Balerdi, and Ian Maguire. This article provides a comprehensive summary of your avocado tree, including how to plant, fertilize, manage pests and diseases, and store the fruit.

Sliced avocado, citrus, and guacamole.If you’re not ready to jump in on planting your own trees, but this post has made your mouth water, check out South Florida Tropicals: Avocado by Linda B. Bobroff and Amy Simonne. This article tells you how best to select, prepare, and store avocados. It also includes sample recipes, including dressings, soups, and salads.

For more information on avocados, including more in-depth looks at protecting trees from pests and disease, see the AskIFAS topic page, search the AskIFAS database, or ask your local UF/IFAS Extension agent. Happy eating!