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What to plant in February

February

What to Plant

Annuals/Bedding plants: Plants that can take a chill include dianthus, pansy, viola, and dusty miller. See Annualshttp://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/topic_annual_landscape_plants

Bulbs: Try dahlia, crinum, and agapanthus. Provide adequate water for establishment and protect them from cold with mulch. See Bulbs for Floridahttp://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/topic_bulbous_flowers

Flowering plants: Many trees and shrubs will be in bloom, including red maple (Acer rubrum) and star magnolia (Magnolia kobus var. stellata). See Southern Tree Fact Sheetshttp://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/department_envhort-trees

Vegetables: Plant potatoes now. Start with healthy seed pieces purchased from a local nursery or online seed catalog. Continue to plant cool-season crops. See Vegetable Gardening in Floridahttp://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/topic_vegetable_gardening

What to Do

Palms: Give cold-damaged palms proper care to encourage their recovery. See Cold Protection and Chilling Damage of Landscape Plantshttp://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/topic_landscapes_and_cold

Citrus: Avoid pruning until spring. Cold temperatures may still injure citrus. See Home Citrus Culturehttp://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/topic_citrus_home_citrus_culture

Roses: Prune roses this month to remove damaged canes and improve the overall form. After pruning, fertilize and apply a fresh layer of mulch. Blooming will begin 8–9 weeks after pruning. See Roseshttp://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/topic_rose

Shrubs: Make certain that you know the height and spread of any shrub you plan to install. Not all shrubs are suitable for planting next to homes or under windows. See Shrubshttp://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/topic_shrubs and The Florida-Friendly Landscaping™ Guide to Plant Selection and Landscape Design: http://fyn.ifas.ufl.edu/pdf/FYN_Plant_Selection_Guide_v090110.pdf

Lawn: Apply a preemergence weed killer (not a “weed and feed” fertilizer) when temperatures rise to 65°F for 4–5 days to prevent warm-season weeds. Timing is important for good control. See Lawn Weedshttp://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/topic_lawn_weeds

Citrus and other fruit trees: Fertilize now if not done in January. Frequency and amount of fertilization depend on the age of the tree. SeeHome Citrus Culturehttp://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/topic_citrus_home_citrus_culture and Temperate Fruit for the Home Landscapehttp://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/topic_home_temperate_fruit

Tables

Table 1.Planting Guide for Florida Vegetables.

Crop

Planting Dates in Florida (outdoors) 1

Yield per 10 ft (pounds)

Plants per 10 ft 2

Days to Harvest 3

Spacing (inches)

Seed depth (inches)

Transplant Ability 5

Plant Family 6

North

Central

South

Plants

Rows 4

Arugula

Sept–Mar

Sept–Mar

Oct–Mar

2.5

30–40

35–60

3–4

10

¼

I

(Cabbage) Brassicaceae

Beans, bush

Mar–Apr Aug–Sept

Feb–Apr Aug–Sept

Sept–Apr

4.5

30–60

45–60

2–4

18

1–1½

III

(Bean) Fabaceae

Beans, pole

Mar–Apr Aug–Sept

Feb–Apr Aug–Sept

Sept–Apr

8

24–40

50–70

3–5

36

1–1½

III

(Bean) Fabaceae

Beans, lima

Mar–Apr Aug

Feb–Mar Aug–Sept

Sept–Apr

5

20–40

60–80

3–6

18

1–1½

III

(Bean) Fabaceae

Beets

Aug–Feb

Sept–Feb

Oct–Jan

7.5

30–60

50–70

2–4

12

½ –1

I

(Beet) Chenopodiaceae

Broccoli

Aug–Feb

Sept–Feb

Oct–Jan

5

8–12

75–90 (50–70)

10–15

24

¼– ½

I

(Cabbage) Brassicaceae

Brussels Sprouts

Aug–Feb

Sept–Feb

Oct–Jan

10

5–7

90–120 (70–90)

18–24

24

¼–½

I

(Cabbage) Brassicaceae

Cabbage

Aug–Feb

Sept–Feb

Sept–Jan

12

8–13

85–110 (70–90)

9–16

24

¼– ½

I

(Cabbage) Brassicaceae

Cantaloupes

Feb–Apr

Jan–Mar

Dec–Mar

15

4–6

85–110 (70–90)

20–36

60

½–1

III

(Squash) Cucurbitaccae

Carrots

Aug–Mar

Aug–Mar

Sept–Mar

10

40–120

70–120

1–3

10

¼

II

(Carrot) Apiaceae

Cauliflower

Aug–Feb

Sept–Feb

Sept–Jan

8

7–10

75–90 (50–70)

12–18

24

¼– ½

I

(Cabbage) Brassicaceae

Celery

Aug–Feb

Sept–Mar

Oct–Mar

15

10–20

75–90

6–12

18

On surface

II

(Carrot) Apiaceae

Chinese cabbage

Aug–Feb

Sept–Apr

Sept–Apr

10

7–9

70–90 (60–70)

14–18

14

¼ – ½

I

(Cabbage) Brassicaceae

Collards

Aug–Feb

Sept–Feb

Sept–Jan

15

5–10

70–90 (50–70)

12–24

24

¼– ½

I

(Cabbage) Brassicaceae

Corn, sweet

Feb–Apr

Jan–Apr

Oct–Mar

12

15–20

65–90

6–8

28

1–1½

III

(Grass) Poaceae

Cucumbers

Feb–Apr July–Aug

Jan–Mar Sept

Sep–Feb

10

10–20

40–65

6–12

48

½–¾

III

(Squash) Cucurbitaceae

Eggplant

Feb–Mar Aug

Jan–Feb Aug–Sept

Aug–Feb

20

3–7

90–115 (70–90)

18–40

36

½–¾

I

(Tomato) Solanaceae

Endive/ Escarole

Jan–Feb Aug–Oct

Aug–Feb

Sept–Mar

7.5

8–9

60–80

14–16

18

¼

I

(Aster) Asteraceae

Kale

Aug–Feb

Sept–Feb

Sept–Jan

7.5

9–10

50–70

8–12

18–

¼– ½

I

(Cabbage) Brassicaceae

Kohlrabi

Sept–Mar

Oct–Mar

Oct–Feb

10

24–40

70–80 (50–55)

3–5

24

½

I

(Cabbage) Brassicaceae

Lettuce

Jan–Feb Sept–Oct

Sept–Feb

Sept–Feb

7.5

10–15

60–80

8–12

18

¼

I

(Aster) Asteraceae

Mustard

Aug–Feb

Sept–Feb

Sept–Jan

10

12–24

40–50

5–10

12

¼– ½

II

(Cabbage) Brassicaceae

Okra

Mar–June

Feb–Aug

Jan–Mar Aug–Oct

7

12–30

60–70

4–10

36

½–1

III

(Hibiscus) Malvaceae

Onions, Bulbing

Mid–Sept – Mid–Nov

Oct

Oct

10

30

100–130

4–6

14

¼–½

III

(Lily) Liliaceae

Onions, Bunching (Green and Shallots)

Aug–Mar

Aug–Mar

Sept–Mar

10

30

50–75 (green) 75–100 (shallots)

2 (green) 6–8 (shallots)

14

¼–½

III

(Lily) Liliaceae

Peas, Snow or English

Jan–Mar

Nov–Feb

Nov–Feb

4

20–60

60–80

2–6

12

1–1½

III

(Bean) Fabaceae

Peas, southern

Mar–July

Feb–Aug

Sept–Apr

8

20–60

75–90

2–6

12

1–1½

III

(Bean) Fabaceae

Peppers

Feb–Mar July– Aug

Jan–Mar Aug–Sept

Aug–Feb

5

8–13

90–100 (65–75)

9–15

15

¼–½

I

(Tomato) Solanaceae

Potatoes, Irish

Jan–Feb

Nov–Feb

Oct–Jan

15

12–24

85–110

5–10

36–42

3–4 (seed pieces)

II

(Tomato) Solanaceae

Potatoes, sweet

Mar–Jun

Feb–Jun

Dec–Sept

30

10–12

85–130

10–12

36

I

(Morning Glory) Convolvulaceae

Pumpkin

Early July

Mid July

Early Aug

30

2–4

80–100 (70–90)

36–60

60

1½ –2

III

(Squash) Cucurbitaceae

Radish

Sept– Mar

Sept–Mar

Oct–Mar

4

120

20–30

1

6

¼

III

(Cabbage) Brassicaceae

Spinach

Sept–Mar

Sept–Mar

Oct–Feb

4

20–60

45–60

2–6

12

½

II

(Beet) Chenopodiaceae

Squash, Summer

Feb–Apr Aug–Sept

Jan–Apr Aug–Sept

Aug–Mar

15

5–10

40–50

12–24

36

1–1½

III

(Squash) Cucurbitaceae

Squash, Winter

Feb–Apr Aug–Sept

Jan–Apr Aug–Sept

Aug–Mar

30

2–4

85–120

36–60

60

1½ –2

III

(Squash) Cucurbitaceae

Strawberry

Sept 15– Oct 15

Sept 25– Oct 25

Oct 1– Dec 1

9–12

8–10

(30–60)

12–16

12

– – –

I

(Rose) Rosaceae

Swiss Chard

Sept–May

Sept–May

Sept–Mar

8–12

10–20

45–60

6–12

18

¼–½

I

(Beet) Chenopodiaceae

Tomatoes (supported)

Feb–Apr July–Aug

Jan–Feb Aug–Sept

Aug–Feb

2

4–7

90–110 (70–90)

18–32

48

¼– ½

I

(Tomato) Solanaceae

Turnips

Aug–Feb

Sept–Feb

Sept–Jan

15

20–60

40–60

2–6

12

¼– ½

III

(Cabbage) Brassicaceae

Watermelon

Feb–Apr

Jan–Mar

Dec–Mar

40

3–5

80–100 (60–90)

24–48

60

1½ –2

III

(Squash) Cucurbitaceae

North = all of Florida north of State Road 40; central = the section of Florida between State Roads 40 and 70; south = all of Florida below State Road 70.

2 Use transplants (if appropriate) or buy the amount of seed needed to grow this many plants per 10 feet of row. Most seed packets state the number of seeds the packet contains.

3 Days from seeding to harvest: values in parentheses are days from transplants to first harvest.

4 Minimum distance between rows (when planting in rows). Row spacing can be reduced or ignored as long as plants are spaced correctly.

5 Transplant ability (the ability of a seedling to be successfully transplanted): I = easily survives transplanting; II = survives transplanting with care; III = only plant seeds or containerized transplants with developed root systems.

6 Rotate plant families = avoid successively planting vegetables from the same family in the same area of the garden.

For more information visit: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/vh021

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