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Lantana – Wild Weeds

Wild Weeds – Weed of the Month

Lantana

Lantana camara
Lantana camara

Lantana camara

Lantana is a tricky plant in natural areas. There is a Florida native lantana, L. depressa, but unfortunately it is now considered endangered. Majority of lantana found in natural landscapes in Florida is the invasive species, L. camara. This perrenial plant is often used in ornamental landscapes because of its unique clustered flowers with varying colors. The native lantana is only present with yellow flowers whereas L. camara can appear with red/orange, light/dark pink, and other color variations.

Lantana serves as a pollinator plant

Lantana serves as a pollinator plant

Each species of Lantana is highly prolific and can reproduce vegetatively or by seed. Each plant can produce in upwards of 12,000 seeds! These seeds are spread by animals across the state increasing the ability of the species to become invasive. It is important to note that Lantana is toxic to livestock.

Control Methods

native lantana Glyphosate is marginally effective as a foliar spray and regrowth is common. Fluroxypyr (Vista) plus aminopyralid (Milestone VM) at rates of 2.6 pt and 7 oz/A, respectively, applied twice within 6 months is effective, but costly. Fluroxypyr or imazapyr applied as a basal application is consistently effective. However, mowing and spraying the freshly cut stumps is the easiest application technique and requires the least amount of herbicide.

Learn more about Lantana here >>

Wild Weeds is a monthly spotlight written by Alicia Halbritter, Baker County Agriculture & Natural Resources Agent. Wild Weeds highlights plants you may find in Florida on the roadside, while hiking, in the forest, or possibly even in your yard. Searching for more information on a particular plant? Email Alicia at aliciah1221@ufl.edu for more information/questions.

One Comment on “Lantana – Wild Weeds

  1. Live stock includes the family dog as far as toxicity goes. I had the native for my butterfly garden and some “wild” invasive which Brody thought was scrumptious. After a frantic call to the vet and administering an emetic my yard no longer has lantana.

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