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A young boy inspects a garden plant with big leaves. [CREDIT: UF/IFAS Extension]

Getting into the (One Seed salad) mix in the garden

Hopefully, when it comes to gardening, you’re not like me.

I have no green thumb.

I work in an office with horticulture agents and Master Gardener Volunteers, of course. And, I truly appreciate the range of knowledge and skills they bring when it comes to being a successful gardener.

But, even with those resources, when I was recruited last year with a pitch on how easy it is to grow a salad mix, I was skeptical, to say the least. I thought I would give it a try, though, because we enjoy salad most nights of the week in my home.

"One Seed" program bannerArmed with simple instructions, I set out to sprout salad mix from seeds. Dutifully, and with a well-earned sense of dread, I planted the seeds in a fairly large container in my lanai, watered regularly, and waited.

Amazingly (for me), my gardening tale had a happy ending: healthy plants. For once, I was able to enjoy wonderful salads fresh from my lanai.

You can write your own happy growing tale, too. UF/IFAS Extension Sarasota County is offering free One Seed packets—complete with a packet of salad mix seeds—through the One Seed program. You can pick up a seed packet at our office within the next week, or get one by visiting your local Sarasota County public library in the next two weeks.

The wonderful part about growing your own salad is that you can cut your greens and it will grow back in another week or so. And these seeds will give back to you several times before calling it quits.

The seeds also do well in raised beds. But, be cautious about planting outside of a protected area, unless you don’t mind sharing your salad mix with other little creatures.

In my next blog, I want to cover some delicious salad dressing ideas that are simple and delicious, as well as talk about the health benefits of eating salad.

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