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Tag: horticulture

UF/IFAS Extension Orange County “Safely Resuming Operations”

Beginning on Monday, June 1, 2020, the Orange County Extension Education Center, 6021 S. Conway Road will SAFELY resume operations on a limited basis from 8:00am – Noon, Monday – Friday. You must have an appointment. Please call… Read More

New Vegetable Gardener — Organic Practices in the Backyard Vegetable Garden

cucumber, tomatoes, peppers, green onions

When a group of backyard gardeners get together and talk about the organic practices they use in the vegetable gardens, you will often hear information that is confusing, such as I don’t use chemicals in my garden, I… Read More

New Vegetable Gardener — Gardening with Fewer Pesticides – Integrated Pest Management (IPM)

cucumber, tomatoes, peppers, green onions

Pesticides are greatly misunderstood by many and incorrectly used by some. Do we need to use pesticides at all in the vegetable garden? I know many of you just jumped on this question with a resounding “NO!” You… Read More

Artificial Lighting for Growing Vegetables at Home

The sun is an excellent form of light and is very affordable, but it may not always be available. Growing vegetables with artificial lights provides growers with an opportunity to defeat the seasons and to grow food in… Read More

How to Take a Good Plant Sample

Hedge with one dead shrub

One of the great benefits of working with UF/IFAS Extension is that local experts are working in every county in Florida using science to solve problems, especially those related to lawns and landscapes! These experts are known as… Read More

Cool Caladiums

Caladium Foliage

Many of my friends are crazy about caladiums. I’m not much for foliage plants; if it doesn’t flower or fruit, why bother? But after seeing the range of sizes and colors that can sizzle in a shady corner,… Read More

When Good Worms go Bad – New Guinea Flatworm

New Guinea Flatworm

There’s a worm in town, but it’s not that fat, happy earthworm that we like to find tilling our gardens. Instead, it’s a flatworm, which kind of looks like a cross between a slug and an small earthworm…. Read More