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Tag: invasive plants

Learn about invasive species in free virtual workshop

The next “Gardening in the Panhandle LIVE!” will discuss invasive species, live on Oct. 14 at 1 p.m. Eastern, noon Central. Recordings are posted afterward at tinyurl.com/GardeningLive. Zoom requires pre-registration, and viewers have another option… Read More

Junior Cattlemen & UF/IFAS Crew Care for Rookery Bay

MARCO ISLAND, Fla. — A group of young cattlemen and cattlewomen, alongside UF/IFAS animal sciences faculty and staff worked to remove invasive plants from the Snail Trail at the Rookery Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve… Read More

UF researchers to use AI to predict how hurricanes spread invasive plants

Scientists project hurricane intensity and frequency will increase with climate change. That leads researchers to want to better predict how storms will disperse and establish nonnative plant invaders. Knowing where invasive plants spread will always… Read More

Newly banned beach weed threatens sea turtle nesting sites

With this year’s sea turtle nesting season nearing its conclusion in Florida, many of the protected species’ newest hatchlings have completed their first big journey from their sandy nests to the water. But a crawling… Read More

UF professor’s paper earns recognition from Weed Science Society of America

by Olivia Doyle GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Earlier this month, the Weed Science Society of America (WSSA) gave special recognition to a paper authored by University of Florida professor James Leary, honoring it as an Outstanding… Read More

Horseback riders address invasive species problem across Florida

A UF/IFAS Extension program educates outdoor enthusiasts to report invasive plant species with a unique vantage point – from horseback. In doing so, participants can help UF/IFAS reduce some of the invasive species that cost… Read More

An Urbanized Florida Means More Stormwater Ponds, Invasive Plants

As Florida becomes increasingly urbanized, more than half the state’s stormwater ponds appear in two metropolitan areas — Orlando and Tampa Bay, new research from the University of Florida shows. In their first attempt to… Read More