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Tag: marsh

What’s going on along Cedar Key’s shorelines?

A fyke net captures organisms as they flee from the marsh on a falling tide

Coastal change is obvious along Cedar Key’s shorelines. One of the most noticeable changes is rapid erosion along the shorelines of Daughtry Bayou. Erosion is a natural process in coastal ecosystems but becomes an issue when it threatens… Read More

NCBS Intern Report: Finding the Cedar Key Salt Marsh Vole

Written by 2019 Summer Intern Camila Leon, with host Robert McCleery from UF IFAS Wildlife Ecology and Conservation Introduction I was fortunate enough to work with Dr. McCleery and Dr. Taillie’s project for the Nature Coast Biological Station’s… Read More

NCBS Intern Report: Sea-level Rise and Saltmarsh Dynamics in the Gulf of Mexico, FL

Written by 2019 Summer Intern Sarah Tevlin, with hosts Carrie Adams and Stephanie Verhulst with UF IFAS Environmental Horticulture Department.  A Study in Splinters. This summer, I had the honor of working with the Carrie Adams Restoration and… Read More

Living Shoreline Master Plan for Cedar Key

shoreline with transplanted marsh grass that will grow into a living shoreline

Living Shoreline Guidance at a Local Scale In recent years, sea-level rise, erosion, and loss of habitat around Cedar Key have become increasing concerns. Homeowners and land managers should critically evaluate how “gray” a shoreline erosion solution really… Read More

Redeeming a seawall

seawall with reef balls in front at the UF IFAS Nature Coast Biological Station

Shoreline armoring Most Floridians already know about the loss and degradation of our coastal habitats. One of the major causes of coastal habitat loss is shoreline armoring. Shoreline armoring, or hardening, occurs when seawalls, bulkheads, and large rocks… Read More

Donor Marsh at Duke Energy

volunteers plant marsh grasses at the donor marsh

The problem Habitat loss is a huge problem along the Gulf on Mexico coast. Many groups are attempting to address habitat loss via restoration. Restored habitats include marshes, oyster and coral reefs, and dunes. However, restoration requires access… Read More

Establishing a Donor Marsh at Duke Energy

a shoreline with transplanted marsh grass

Calling all coastal habitat lovers! We are gearing up for a great project that will make shoreline restoration and enhancement projects such as living shorelines much easier in the Nature Coast! We need volunteers to help us install… Read More

Spring 2018 Nature Coast Master Naturalist Courses

a shoreline with transplanted marsh grass

A Perfect Backdrop for Learning Florida’s Nature Coast provides an ideal natural classroom. Even the casual onlooker will easily observe diverse ecological interactions. Dolphins feeding along oyster bars, black skimmers flocking along the beach, and white ibis flying… Read More

NCBS Intern Report: Joe Rains Beach Living Shoreline

a shoreline with transplanted marsh grass

NCBS Intern Report By: Kacey Aukema, Intern with UF IFAS Nature Coast Biological Station and Dr. Mark Clark in UF’s Soil and Water Science Department Testing planting strategies for better living shorelines I had the opportunity to work with… Read More