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Southern Wax Myrtle

Fact sheet: Southern Wax Myrtle

Multiple, twisted trunks with smooth, light grey bark, aromatic, olive green leaves, and clusters of grey-blue, waxy berries on female plants which are attractive to wildlife are just some of the reasons southern waxmyrtle is such a popular landscape plant. Most specimens form a multi-stemmed, open, rounded canopy of weak trunks and branches. This rapidly-growing, small, evergreen native tree is capable of reaching a height of 25 feet with an equal spread but is usually seen in the 10 to 20-foot range. Sometimes used as a large shrubbery screen, southern waxmyrtle is ideal for use as a small tree, the lower limbs removed to reveal its picturesque form. One, or several clustered together, provide pleasing dappled shade for terraces or patios.

Scientific name: Myrica cerifera
Pronunciation: MEER-ih-kuh ser-IF-er-uh
Common name(s): Southern waxmyrtle, southern bayberry

Fact sheet: Southern Wax Myrtle

Sold at Nassau County Master Gardener Plant Sale