Category: Natural Resources

Irma is gone, now what? UF experts offer help with safety, insurance

  GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Now that Hurricane Irma has wreaked havoc and destruction, residents may be wondering what to do first. Angela Lindsey, the UF/IFAS Extension representative for the Extension Disaster Education Network, offers tips on how to… Read More

UF staff track thousands of buildings during, after hurricane

  Sure, you have to worry about your home during Hurricane Irma, wondering if the roof will suffer damage, or the siding will be ripped off. But imagine worrying about 1,298 buildings during the storm? That job falls… Read More

UF Extension gives tips on how to protect livestock during hurricane

EDITOR’S NOTE: This information was compiled in 2017 and remains relevant to any future storm preparation and recovery needs. GAINESVILLE, Fla. — While Florida residents scramble to prepare for another hurricane, agriculture operators are working to make sure… Read More

UF/IFAS Nature Coast Biological Station grand opening Sept. 22 and 23

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — University of Florida researchers working on Florida’s Nature Coast finally have a place to call home. The grand opening of the Nature Coast Biological Station facility, part of the UF Institute of Food and Agricultural… Read More

Snowy Egrets Hunt In The Sand And Mud

By Les Harrison The dog days of August are resting heavily upon Wakulla County. It is a daily contest between the thermometer and humidity to see which can generate the highest readings to compound the heat index’s effects…. Read More

UF/IFAS WATER

Enhancing and protecting water quality, water quantity, and water supply are high-priorities of the UF/IFAS Cooperative Extension Service. This is because water plays a critical role in sustaining Florida’s environment and economic vitality, which are keys to a high quality of life. Florida must enhance and protect its domestic water supply while also meeting the water requirements of agriculture, horticulture, tourism, and industry, as well as the state’s 20 million inhabitants and its natural systems, all without placing undue pressure on a finite resource.