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What to do with all these radishes!

HARVESTING YOUR GARDEN, WHAT TO DO WITH ALL THOSE RADISHES!

Radishes are an easy vegetable to grow in North Florida in the Spring. And Radishes are a fast growing vegetable that can grow from a seed to a plant in less than 30 days. However, these root vegetables vary in size, taste and color, and can be eaten raw, oven roasted or pickled. The length of time that radishes are allowed to grow, effects their taste. However, the longer they are in the ground, the spicier they become.

Radishes contain only 19 calories per serving and are high in vitamin C, and contain other important nutrients such as folate, potassium and fiber. According to the Center for Disease Control, eating vegetables may help reduce the risk of many diseases, including cancer.

Radishes add color, flavor, and texture to coleslaws, salads and side dishes.

Oven roasting root vegetables helps release their natural sugars and brings out their sweet, nutty flavors!

Here is a light and flavorful coleslaw recipe for all of those freshly picked root vegetables. Adding granny smith apples and thinly sliced radishes to traditional coleslaw, makes it sweet, peppery and delicious!

 

   Cabbage, Apple and Radish Coleslaw  Serves: 8       Prep Time: 10 minutes
INGREDIENTS:

5 cups of shredded cabbage, red or green

1 cup granny smith Apples, cut into small pieces

¾ cup radish, cut into small pieces

2 tablespoons white onions diced

DRESSING:

¼ cup sugar

¼ cup cider vinegar

1.5 tablespoons water

1.5 tablespoons oil

1/8 teaspoon celery seed

1/8 teaspoon dry mustard

A pinch of salt and pepper

INSTRUCTIONS:

Mix cabbage, radishes, apples and onions in large mixing bowl

In smaller bowl, combine sugar, vinegar, water, oil, mustard, celery seed and salt and pepper, and mix well

Add dressing to cabbage mix and stir well.

 

To learn more about Radishes, Visit the FDAC website at: http://www.freshfromflorida.com/content/search?SearchText=radishes

To learn more about Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, visit the CDC Website at

https://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/

Author: Laurie Osgood – osgoodlb@ufl.edu

Laurie B. Osgood is the Family and Consumer Sciences Agent at the Gadsden County Extension office. You can contact her at: (850) 875-7255. http://gadsden.ifas.ufl.edu