Staying Ahead of the Invasive Species Wave with EDRR Training

Even the best prevention efforts cannot stop all invasive species but Early Detection and Rapid Response (EDRR) is a critical second defense against the establishment of new invasive species populations. EDRR increases the likelihood that localized invasive populations will be found, contained, and eradicated before they become widely established. Futhermore, EDRR can slow range expansion and avoid the need for costly long-term control efforts.

Join us for a day in the field!

Coral ardisia, fruiting. Photo by: Shannon Carnevale, UF/IFAS Extension Polk

The Heartland CISMA is hosting a field workshop on June 22, 2017, to discuss two of Central Florida’s EDRR invasive species: Scleria microcarpa and Ardisia crenata. At this workshop, participants will learn how to identify each species, suggested management techniques, and decontamination strategies to help reduce the spread of exotic species. Presenters include Alex Onisko (South Florida Water Management District), Erik Egensteiner (Lake Kissimmee State Park), and Shannon Carnevale (UF/IFAS Extension Polk County).

Scleria microcarpa in a cypress dome. Photo by: Alex Onisko, SWFWMD

The workshop will take place at Lake Kissimmee State Park on June 22nd from 9AM until Noon. Please wear field-appropriate clothing and shoes. You may want to bring bugspray, a hat, and/or wear sunscreen. Bring a pair of work gloves, this training will include hands-on management training for coral ardisia if time allows.

No lunch will be served but two Natural Areas CEUs will be available for participants who need them. This field workshop is offered for free by the Heartland CISMA and partnering agencies.

Eventbrite - EDRR Field Workshop: Scleria microcarpa & Ardisia crenata