Tag: psyllid

Kaolin Clay May Be Viable Option to Protect Citrus Trees from Asian Citrus Psyllid, UF/IFAS Researchers Say

By Tom Nordlie GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Florida citrus growers have begun taking notice of kaolin clay, a powdery white compound, because it can cause Asian citrus psyllids to “not take notice” of their groves. Long used to protect… Read More

UF/IFAS Scientists Use Fungus to Manage Asian Citrus Psyllid

By Robin Koestoyo FORT PIERCE, Fla.– Fighting plant disease with jet blast sprays is standard practice for citrus growers. But, to spray a fungus to control a single insect that carries a disease-causing pathogen is uncommon. University of… Read More

UF study: Screen houses may help prevent grapefruit greening

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Grapefruit grows better under screen houses than in unprotected groves because the indoor facilities keep out the insect that causes citrus greening, new University of Florida research shows. Protecting citrus from greening is essential, UF/IFAS… Read More

UF researchers identify citrus cultivars that show promise in battle against greening

Click above for video about citrus breeding and citrus greening research. Click here for photo. Caption at bottom. GAINESVILLE, Fla. — University of Florida researchers have some encouraging results in the battle against citrus greening. They have identified… Read More

Citrus greening bacterium may “ring the dinner bell” to attract insect

Cutline at bottom. Click here for high-resolution image. The bacterium responsible for citrus greening causes infected trees to give off a scent that rings the dinner bell for the disease-carrying insect, University of Florida researchers say. This finding… Read More

UF: Insecticide resistance developing in psyllid that carries citrus disease

Caption at bottom. Click here for high resolution image. GAINESVILLE, Fla. — In Florida’s war against citrus greening, producers face a new threat — the insects they’re fighting are becoming less sensitive to insecticides, according to a new… Read More

Disease-carrying Asian citrus psyllids find refuge in abandoned groves, UF study shows

Cutline at bottom. Click here for high-resolution image. GAINESVILLE, Fla. — For years, citrus growers have feared that abandoned groves provided refuge for the Asian citrus psyllid, an invasive insect that transmits citrus greening—now, University of Florida researchers… Read More