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Join beach cleanups this Saturday during International Coastal Cleanup

By Rhett Register

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — This weekend is the 34th annual International Coastal Cleanup, an effort by coastal communities to remove trash from their beaches and coastal areas. Created and run by The Ocean Conservancy, a national nonprofit, the program relies on local partners to orchestrate and run the cleanups. To date, more than 1 million volunteers have removed over 23 million pounds of trash in cleanups around the world.

This year, Florida Sea Grant is hosting five cleanup events throughout the state. These are among the more than 300 Florida cleanups shown on the Ocean Conservancy website.

“Anyone can participate,” says Brittany Hall-Scharf, UF/IFAS Extension Florida Sea Grant agent in Hernando County. At her county’s event, volunteers will be given gloves, trash bags and water, and the first 300 participants will also receive a T-shirt and raffle ticket. Learn more about the event here.

Ana Zangroniz, UF/IFAS Extension Florida Sea Grant agent in Miami-Dade County, will be working in partnership with Biscayne National Park to host a cleanup on one of Elliott Key’s sea turtle nesting beaches. Learn more about the event here.

UF/IFAS Extension Florida Sea Grant fellow Caitlin Barker is working with Broward County and partners to host an event at the Dr. Von D. Mizell Eula-Johnson State Park. Learn more about the event here.

Savanna Barry, UF/IFAS Extension Florida Sea Grant agent, will be hosting the cleanup at Cedar Key. Learn more about the event here.

Laura Tiu, UF/IFAS Extension Florida Sea Grant agent in Okaloosa and Walton counties, will be helping at the four cleanup sites in Okaloosa County. Learn more about the event here.

Besides being one of the longest-running and largest coastal cleanups, the International Coastal Cleanup is also unique in that it analyzes all of the trash that is collected.

The 2017 cleanup’s collection was the first year each of the top 10 trash items contained plastic components, if they weren’t entirely made of plastic, Barry noted. For example, cigarette butts, which often top the list, have a plastic filter. Knowing the types of trash has led to some productive changes, she adds.

“Some beaches have installed more cigarette receptacles,” Barry said. Also, hosts have asked for sponsorships from companies whose products are frequently found during the cleanups.

Events are happening all over the state this Saturday (Sept. 21), and anyone can be involved. To learn more, visit The Ocean Conservancy website at oceanconservancy.org/trash-free-seas/.

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The mission of the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences is to develop knowledge relevant to agricultural, human and natural resources and to make that knowledge available to sustain and enhance the quality of human life. With more than a dozen research facilities, 67 county Extension offices, and award-winning students and faculty in the UF College of Agricultural and Life Sciences, UF/IFAS works to bring science-based solutions to the state’s agricultural and natural resources industries, and all Florida residents. Visit the UF/IFAS web site at ifas.ufl.edu and follow us on social media at @UF_IFAS.

Florida Sea Grant is a university-based program that supports research, education and extension to conserve coastal resources and enhance economic opportunities for the people of Florida. The program is a partnership between the Florida Board of Education, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and Florida’s citizens and governments. Florida Sea Grant’s extension, education and outreach programs are done in partnership with UF/IFAS Extension and coastal counties of Florida.

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