Natives Blooming at Wakulla Extension

Native Blooming at Wakulla Extension

With the warmer weather and rain from Mother Nature, we have several native wildflowers in bloom at the Extension Office.  On your next trip to Crawfordville, drop by and walk the grounds to see some of these lovely flowers in bloom: Blanket Flower, Brown-Eyed Susan, Coral Bean, Indian Pink, Oakleaf Hydrangea, and Shrimp Plant.

Blanket Flower (Gaillardia)

This is a sturdy, native perennial, that blooms in the summer through the fall.  They do well in our sandy soil, and are even salt-tolerant.  Butterflies love this plant!  http://gardeningsolutions.ifas.ufl.edu/plants/ornamentals/gaillardia.html

Brown-Eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta L.)
Brown-Eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta L.)

Brown-Eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta L.)

 

This wildflower is widespread throughout the United States. It is considered an annual plant, but will re-seed itself readily so it comes back year after year.  Bees, birds and butterflies are attracted to the cheerful blooms during the summer.  https://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=ruhi2

 

Coral Bean (Erythrina herbacea)
Coral Bean (Erythrina herbacea)

Coral Bean (Erythrina herbacea)

 

This plant can be a large perennial shrub, up to 6 feet tall and in diameter, until it freezes back in the winter.  Red tubular flowers grow on tall stalks in the spring.  While driving on our rural roads, you may see some blooming along the tree lines.  They are a nice choice for the back of a ‘natural’ landscape.  This plant is salt tolerant and also drought tolerant once established.  http://gardeningsolutions.ifas.ufl.edu/plants/ornamentals/coral-bean.html

 

Indian Pink (Spigelia marilandica)
Indian Pink (Spigelia marilandica)

Indian Pink (Spigelia marilandica)

 

A small perennial that does well in part shade.  The bright red flowers attract hummingbirds. You can prolong flowering by removing the flowers as they wither. https://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=spma3

 

 

 

 

Oakleaf Hydrangea (Hydrangea quercifolia)
Oakleaf Hydrangea (Hydrangea quercifolia)

Oakleaf Hydrangea (Hydrangea quercifolia)

 

This is a coarse-textured, native shrub that does well in the shade.  Once the weather warms up it produces large, cone-shaped clusters of white flowers that will stay on the plant and turn color to light pink.  The leaves are also showy in the fall when they turn bronze or purple. http://gardeningsolutions.ifas.ufl.edu/plants/ornamentals/oakleaf-hydrangea.html

 

Shrimp Plant (Justica brandegeana) 
Shrimp Plant (Justica brandegeana)

Shrimp Plant (Justica brandegeana)

 

A must have for a butterfly/hummingbird garden!  Easy to grow in full sun to part shade.  In north Florida, the shrimp plant will die back with a frost, but usually returns in the spring.  It can reach 2 to 6 feet tall in central and south Florida. http://gardeningsolutions.ifas.ufl.edu/plants/ornamentals/shrimp-plant.html

 

 

The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information, and other services only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, political opinions, or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A&M University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating

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