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Tag: Lee County

Fact Sheet: Survey of Insecticides Available for Homeowners in Lee County, Florida

Survey of Insecticides Available for Homeowners in Lee County, Florida: 2013 The insecticides below are first listed by their family name, for example, Benzoylureas and Neonicontinoids. Knowing the insecticide family is critical when developing a… Read More

Fact Sheet: Insecticides and acaricides registered for use in early 2011 in landscape, nursery, greenhouse or field-grown ornamentals

Insecticides and acaricides registered for use in early 2011 in landscape, nursery, greenhouse or field-grown ornamentals  

Fact Sheet: Survey of Fungicides Available for Homeowners in Lee County, Florida

Mushrooms and fungus

Survey of Fungicides Available for Homeowners in Lee County, Florida Fungicides within the same group have similar chemistries and similar biochemical modes of action within fungal cells. It is prudent to rotate fungicides from different… Read More

Fact Sheet: Survey of Herbicides Available for Homeowners in Lee County, Florida

pulling out weeds from the grass

Survey of Herbicides Available for Homeowners in Lee County, Florida Herbicides are listed by their active ingredient. This avoids the confusion that results from multiple brands that use the same active ingredient. The active ingredient… Read More

Event: Florida Regional Turf Seminar, Fort Myers | Feb 27th 2018

Turf

The Florida Turfgrass Association (FTGA) hosts 12 Regional Turf Seminars throughout the state of Florida. These seminars provide local education programs on topics such as pests and diseases, weeds, BMPs, regulatory issues, safety and pesticide… Read More

Q and A: I don’t know what disease accumulates on the leaves in the following picture. Would you please identify it and tell us what we should spray it with?

From Whitney, Naples Answer: The plant is Schefflera arbooricola. The black substance is sooty mold. Certain sucking insects, notably aphids, scales, and whiteflies, suck sugary sap from plants and excrete it as a substance known… Read More

Q and A: I read your comments about Gaillardia in the January and February issue of Florida Gardening magazine. Are you talking about buying the actual plants and planting them or do you mean starting them from seeds? I have had a good bit of luck harvesting the seeds from dead or spent heads in the summer, refrigerating them and then sowing them in the winter for a spring and summer bloom.

Blanket Sunflower

From Mark, by email Answer: Gaillardia pluchella, simply known as gaillardia, is a very cold tolerant native plant. As such, it can be started from seeds, or planted as young seedlings in winter without concern… Read More