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Tag: Michael Rogers

Plant Improvement Specialist to Ensure New Citrus Varieties Have Best Traits

LAKE ALFRED, Fla. — Many citrus growers want to replant their groves that are withering because of greening. But they need field data to know which varieties to plant. Gathering that information takes time. As a rule, though,… Read More

UF/IFAS Economist: Hurricane Dorian’s Impact on Florida Agriculture Was Minimal

One day after Hurricane Dorian crept past Florida’s Atlantic coast, impacts to the state’s agricultural and natural resources-based industries appear to be minimal, according to an economist with the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences…. Read More

Dorian’s Swing Threatens 770,000 Acres of Ag Land in Florida East Coast Counties

Hurricane Dorian began its much-anticipated northward swing Tuesday morning and is now expected to skirt Florida’s Atlantic coast, threatening a dozen coastal counties that are home to 9 million residents and more than 770,000 acres of agricultural land…. Read More

UF/IFAS Helps Assess, Manage New Fruit Bug

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Researchers with the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences are already trying to help growers figure out how to effectively manage the problems created by an invasive pest  – confirmed last week… Read More

New UF/IFAS Citrus Trial Data Available

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — New research data are available from trials for citrus rootstocks, scions and combinations of the two that University of Florida scientists hope will broaden the options of greening-tolerant citrus varieties available to commercial growers. Michael… Read More

UF/IFAS Event Combines Latest Citrus Varieties with New Breeding Research

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Citrus growers can see if they want to grow the latest varieties from UF/IFAS breeders — and then learn more about commercializing crops – all on Dec. 4 at the University of Florida Institute of… Read More

Kaolin Clay May Be Viable Option to Protect Citrus Trees from Asian Citrus Psyllid, UF/IFAS Researchers Say

By Tom Nordlie GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Florida citrus growers have begun taking notice of kaolin clay, a powdery white compound, because it can cause Asian citrus psyllids to “not take notice” of their groves. Long used to protect… Read More